Pride goes before a fall – as a teacher

My last post described how I don’t push or spend time emphasizing correct French pronunciation in my classes.  The evidence behind this practice shows that given enough comprehensible repetition, students eventually self-correct once they HEAR the sounds.  I shared the example of my student eventually vocalizing ‘beaucoup’ correctly. The very next week, I was humbled.  I was… Read More Pride goes before a fall – as a teacher

The power of repetition

   Pronunciation corrections take care of themselves in a ‘TPRS’ classroom.  Creating a curriculum based on the pedagogy called Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling takes as its premise the following: given enough comprehensible repetitive input that students find compelling, students will become proficient in speaking French and doing so with ‘adequate’ pronunciation I welcomed… Read More The power of repetition

The value of visiting another French teacher’s class

  Our North Carolina Association of Independent Schools (NCAIS) offered the possibility of an exchange between teachers of the same content.  And my school, Carolina Day School in Asheville, supported this opportunity by allowing us to take a professional day when we ventured away from the nest. I scanned the list and the first middle… Read More The value of visiting another French teacher’s class

Teachers as learners

One of the benefits of acquiring a language naturally, that is by constant repetition of comprehensible language, is that phrasing and language chunks start to FEEL right.  TPRS (teaching proficiency through reading and storytelling) is the best methodology I have found for teaching a foreign language. I don’t teach much explicit grammar.  Instead we use… Read More Teachers as learners

A ‘Whoops!’ lesson

I love this methodology called TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling).  It’s all about the students receiving sufficient comprehensible input.   I often remind my classes of middle-schoolers the following: if you don’t know the meaning of a French word or phrase, it’s not your fault.  You just haven’t heard and understood it enough times science… Read More A ‘Whoops!’ lesson